• Radar's Recon

    Radar’s Recon

    Radar O’Reilly is a Shepherd Terrier mix who was brought to Ontario from Kentucky by Niagara Pet Rescue in 2018 when she was 2 years old, shortly after I adopted her. It took a little persuasion as the paperwork that came from the US shelter said “no cats” and I lived with two, but I convinced them I could get the issue under control, and with a fair amount of time, love, patience and a little food she no longer gives chase. That wasn’t the only struggle that came with adopting an older dog. When Ray first came she was suspicious of people and loud noises and she loves to run…

  • Radar's Recon

    Regarding Dog Parks

    Professionally, we don’t recommend heading to the dog park. More often than not, they’re trouble waiting to happen. It’s best to avoid them as a rule of thumb, and here are a few reasons why. Disease Dog parks are an excellent breeding ground for diseases and parasites. Not everyone picks up after their dogs or gets them vaccinated. Even if they do, you can’t always get every little bit of poop, where diseases like parvo can live without a host for up to 10 years. Dog fights Not every person cares or understands that their dog doesn’t like other dogs, and will bring them into the communal area anyway. Even…

  • Radar's Recon

    What To Avoid on Your Walk

    We’ve talked about what plants to avoid keeping in your home, and now that nicer weather is upon us, it’s time to talk about plants you should watch out for while you’re out on a walk.  Pastinaca sativa – Wild Parsnip Wild parsnip commonly grows in large patches, or as scattered plants along roadsides, public recreation areas, sports fields, pastures, fence rows and open areas. You should exercise caution as it only takes three leaves to kill a large dog or child. The roots are so toxic that drinking the water around a wild parsnip plant can be lethal. Symptoms may include but are not limited to,  • Diarrhea •…

  • Radar's Recon

    Is It Time To Choose a Trainer?

    As dog owners, we have the luxury most parents don’t have, and that is picking our dog’s educator. We are not restricted to school zones or religion so take advantage of that! Don’t just go to who’s most popular or because it worked for so-and-so’s neighbour. Yes, recommendations are important but don’t go on that alone.  Here are some tips when looking for a trainer.  Do your online and word-of-mouth research.  Recommendations are important, make sure your trainer has a good reputation before wasting any energy on them.  Know what you’re looking for before you start shopping. Not all trainers offer the same services. It is important to know whether…

  • Radar's Recon

    Shoo Fly! Dont Bother Me!

    When it comes to your dog’s parasite prevention plan, a combination attack is best. You should use a heartworm preventative in combination with one of these vet recommended repellents. Vectra 3D Side effects: There is a potential for chemical burns at the site of application. Additionally, the ointment may cause restlessness and anxiety. This may be a direct result of the treatment or it may indicate irritation at the site to which it was applied. The treatment may also cause lethargy, panting, racing heart, loose stool, vomiting, fever, and excessive thirst. Active ingredients: • Permethrin – a synthetic form of an insecticidal compound produced by the chrysanthemum flower and degrades…

  • Radar's Recon

    Dangerous House Plants

    Many of us like to bring the outdoors in and have plants growing around the house however, not all of those pretty flowers are safe for your pets. The following is a list of plants that should be kept out of your pets reach or kept outside. *Plants lovers should watch out for the whole Araceae family* Elephants Ear If elephant ear is ingested by your pet, it will cause increased salivation, difficulty swallowing, oral irritation, and vomiting Alocasia If your dog puts this one in their mouth, it could cause mucous membrane irritation, intense burning, and irritation of the mouth, lips, and tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting and difficulty swallowing.…

  • Radar's Recon

    The Risk of Lyme Disease and Heartworm

    Lyme disease and Heartworm are two common risks associated with owning a dog. For example, the tick isn’t just a single season problem. They’re able to survive until temperatures are near freezing; in Southern Ontario ticks are, nearly, a year-round problem. These pests are the number one cause for Lyme disease in dogs, the most prevalent being the deer tick.  Lyme disease is a bacterial illness, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. This illness is spread through a tick bite and travels through the bloodstream of the bitten mammal. The most common symptom of Lyme disease is inflammation in the joints, which can severely limit your dog’s ability to walk. This inflammation may…

  • Radar's Recon

    Parasite Prevention

    When it comes to your dog’s parasite prevention plan, a combination attack is best. You should use a heartworm preventative in combination with one of these vet recommended repellents. Vectra 3DSide effects:There is a potential for chemical burns at the site of application. Additionally, the ointment may cause restlessness and anxiety. This may be a direct result of the treatment or it may indicate irritation at the site to which it was applied. The treatment may also cause lethargy, panting, racing heart, loose stool, vomiting, fever, and excessive thirst. Active ingredients:• Permethrin – a synthetic form of an insecticidal compound produced by the chrysanthemum flower and degrades quickly in contact…

  • Uncategorized

    I found a lost dog, what do I do now?

    If you come across a strange dog on your walk, put safety first, especially if you have your own dog. Don’t approach them. This is because you don’t know if the loose dog is friendly and you don’t know how your dog will react to them in your space, it’s best to stay clear.  If you walk your dog in an area where loose dogs or coyotes appear often, think about carrying a small air horn with you. This way, when the dog approaches you, you can use it to scare it off, keeping you and your dog safe. If you are concerned about getting a dog home, carry treats…

  • Radar's Recon

    Oh Baby It’s Hot Outside

    Living  in Southern Ontario means we often handle extreme heat. Dogs aren’t as good at dealing with it as we are. In the summertime, we have to watch out for things like heat stroke and burning paws on the hot sidewalk. Never keep pets in cars or in direct sun on a summer day. In general, with plenty of water and shade, most dogs should be able to cope in warm temperatures, up to about 32˚C. Some products that are available to help cope with heat are; cooling mats and collars like these available on Amazon.  Or consider a raised bed, keeping your dog of the ground will be like…

  • Radar's Recon

    But It’s Raining!

    “It’s raining, it’s pouring, the old man is snoring.” Don’t let the rain keep you and your furry friend inside! Unless it’s pouring or there’s a chance of lightning, there’s no reason you and your dog can’t head on outside for a little training walk.  Here are our recommendations to improve this experience: Rain Coat You should both have one! No one wants to walk cold and damp; having a good raincoat for you both will keep you a warm, stylish pair. Also, having a raincoat for your dog will cut down on the wet dog smell! Boots Sometimes we forget about our do’s feet in the rain because it…